The Archer’s Bow

The artist’s world is limitless. It can be found anywhere, far from where he lives or a few feet away. It is always on his doorstep. – Paul Strand
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The Kingston Peninsula is located in Southern New Brunswick between the Saint John and Kennebecasis Rivers and  home to one of Canada’s most famous photographers, Freeman Patterson. The Kingston Peninsula is accessible by several ferries from either Saint John, Grand Bay-Westfield or Quispamsis. You can also drive to the peninsula directly from the town of Hampton; however, part of the unique charm of this rural community is crossing over by one of the ferries.
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The Upper Moss Glen Falls are well-known in the area and a popular spot for photographers or those who just enjoy nature. The 10 meter waterfalls are near the end of the Puddington Lake Brook just before it exits into the Kennebecasis River. My Wife and I moved to this area a few years after we married and lived there for a few years in the mid 90’s before we moved to our current home in Saint John. We revisited the area about a month ago and walked along the shore of the brook back toward the falls. The waterfalls are usually a bit wider, but due to a drier summer it was a narrow cascade over the rocky cliff.  I was quite fortunate to arrive when I did because the narrow stream of water created a perfect bow-shaped reflection in the calm pool below.
The Archer's Bow

The Archer’s Bow

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Get Lost

There are times when getting lost is just not fun. I can recall a lot of different times I’ve been lost or lost someone. I once lost my youngest daughter for a few minutes at a large outdoor event. I’d have to say it was likely one of the scariest moments of my life. I’ve been lost while driving on several occasions. The worst time I remember was on a trip to New York City when took the wrong exit and ended up in Harlem. I was aiming for Brooklyn. Missed that target just a little.

Intentionally getting lost is another thing all together. When my wife and I were first married we would get in the car or on our bikes and explore as much as possible. No agenda and to no place in particular. Just pick a direction and drive. I have so many great memories from different places, and some of those place we found have become favourite spots for me 15 years later.

Hidden Treasure

A few years after we married my wife and I moved to the Kennebecasis Valley in New Brunswick, to a place called the Kingston Peninsula. The main road for people who chose to drive was through the town of Hampton, but most would cross over the Saint John and Kennebecasis Rivers by one of the several ferries that surround the peninsula. A little history lesson just for fun. William Pitt who invented the cable ferry, installed the first ferry across the Kennebecasis River in 1903 to the Kingston Peninsula.

Shortly after moving to Kingston we decided to take a drive and investigate one of back roads to Hampton which runs along the Kennebecasis River. The narrow dirt road was an amazing discovery, despite the potholes. It has recently become a favourite drive for me again. Small waterfalls, scenic coves, and lush marsh areas offer many photographic opportunities. The attached photos are from a drive my wife and I took last week.

Kennebecasis Bayou

Kennebecasis Bayou

Some of my best photograph have been taken in places discovered by chance, and mostly by getting in the car and seeing where a road leads. Sometimes with my camera and other times with only my family. Many of these places are not very well-known and not likely to be mentioned at the tourist office if you were to ask for recommended places to visit. If you are looking to add a little creative spark or something new to your photography portfolio, I might suggest that you get in the car and explore. At least get on Google Maps and see where some of the roads around you go. You might be pleasantly surprised.

Being a guy and not liking to ask for directions means that I do get lost more often than I would like to admit, but there are those occasions when that’s a good thing. Right?